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Read Time: 4 Minutes 05.22.2017 Website

Anatomy of a Good Pricing Page [Video]

Developing a pricing page that informs and converts is key to scaling your enterprise. In this video, we discuss some of the successful components of pricing pages, analyze the logic behind each component, and then explore what you can do to increase your conversion rates after launching your pricing page.

 

Even if you don’t currently have a public pricing page, many of these principles can also be used to drive conversion on Contact pages and can even be used in proposals. If you need help with any of this, reach out to us — we’d be happy to help you explore your options.


View the text alternative for The B2B Buyer’s Trust Journey video below.

As COO here at Golden Spiral, I spend a lot of time vetting different SaaS products for our team. I see a lot of good pricing pages — and a lot of bad ones — that ultimately influence our buying decision.

Developing a pricing page that informs and converts is key to scaling your enterprise. While every pricing page is and should be a little bit different depending on the buyer persona, the purpose is ultimately the same: eliminate any concerns a prospect might have, then convert ’em into a paying customer.

In this video I’ll discuss some of the more successful components of pricing pages, analyze the logic behind each component, and then we’ll explore what you can do to increase your conversion rates after launching your pricing page. Even if you don’t currently have a public pricing page, many of these principles can also be used to drive conversion on Contact pages and can even be used in proposals. Let’s get started.

Let’s assume that the main purpose of your pricing page is to convert prospects into paying customers. Let’s also assume that if a user has found their way on to your pricing page, they have an understanding of your product and see some value in moving forward. Now that you have them here, you want to address their concerns right away. These are the core components for a pricing page that converts:

1. Pricing Options

The first thing to think about on a pricing page are options. Options fundamentally change how the prospect evaluates your product. In a single-choice option, their decision is binary; a yes or a no. However, by providing options, you nurture your prospect into analyzing how they might work with you, not just whether or not they will work with you.

Another reason to provide options is the need for relativity. As humans, we don’t have an innate sense of what something should cost. We rely on comparison. When you bought your car, did you know exactly what you should pay, or did you compare it to the relative value of other cars? Most of us compare. Providing options on your pricing page gives your prospect context for the cost of a solution and provides a basis of relative value while still in the confines of your website, rather than on the site of your competitor.

A third component to pricing options are the names of the options themselves. Work to align the names with the persona of the buyer rather than using generic names like Bronze, Silver, or Gold. Options such as Single User, Business, and Enterprise would help them quickly identify with the right option for them, and has the added benefit of showing your prospect that you understand who they are and what they need.

2. Customer Testimonials

Keeping with our theme of alleviating concerns, you want to establish your product as a credible tool. You can do this by showcasing customer testimonials right on the page. Remember, your prospects are real people who value the opinions of others. By putting those recommendations front and center, you are connecting them to a broader community who is supporting their decision to work with you. If you have been featured in the press, you can also include the logos of the media outlet or a blurb about what they said about your product.

3. Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions, or FAQs, are another good way to remove barriers. They’re often the most succinct copy on your website. For the pragmatic buyer, this is a nice place to cut through the fluff of feature-talk and front-line messaging and address the concerns you hear in the sales process. You may not get the opportunity to answer their questions directly, so give yourself room to address them early.  I am also a big fan of providing direct contact information in case the prospect has other questions or is interested in a pricing option you didn’t provide.

4. A/B Testing & Re-Marketing

So what if you have done all of these things on your pricing page, but you’re still not seeing the rate of conversion you would like? Try A/B testing different copy, colors, pricing options, and layouts to find the combination that gets the results you are after. You can also initiate a re-marketing campaign to put banner ads in front of the prospects who came to your pricing page but didn’t convert. If you provided a free trial but were unable to get that prospect to sign up after the trial ends, you can periodically send them newsletters that provide insights about their industry. This is a great way to continue to provide value to your prospects and stay top of mind.

Regardless of how you deliver the information about your pricing, remember this: your goal is to alleviate concerns and smooth the path to conversion. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different strategies to find the best solution for your company. If you need help with any of this, reach out to us — we’d be happy to help you explore your options.

Examples of Great Pricing Pages

Peter Smith

Peter Smith

President/COO As our President and COO, Peter oversees Golden Spiral’s operations, workflows, and finances while providing direction and vision for our company’s future.